11 Tips for Hiking the PCT from a Solo-Female Thru-Hiker

Thinking about thru-hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.

11 TIPS FOR HIKING THE PCT FROM A SOLO-FEMALE THRU-HIKER

by Bearfoot Theory’s community manager, Kim Vawter

The Pacific Crest Trail occupied a year of my life. I spent 6 months preparing for the trail, 5 months actually hiking the PCT, and 1 month transitioning back to real life. Solo hiking the Pacific Crest Trail is one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. Now two years later, I get a lot of joy out of helping future PCT thru-hikers accomplish their own goal of hiking all 2,650 miles from Mexico to Canada. In this blog post, I share 11 tips for other solo female PCT hikers to help you prepare for what lies ahead. Combined with the lessons Kristen shared from her John Muir Trail hike, you have more than 30 tips for kicking ass, no matter the number of miles you’re looking to tackle.

Get ready for your thru-hike with these 11 tips for hiking the PCT!

 

1) Build Your Off-Trail Support Community

There is no question about it; I would not have made it through the hike without my family & friends. I had more than 10 friends travel to visit me while I was on the trail. Knowing they were expecting me to be somewhere by a certain date kept me committed. If friends aren’t joining you on the trail you are most likely travelling with a cell phone. Even it it’s just a phone call or Facetime, have a community that you can count on back home to encourage you when you get lonely or feel like quitting.

I also had a friend join me for the first two days which I highly recommend. She built my confidence & ultimately encouraged me to introduce myself to two guys we camped near who ended up being part of the trail family that I hiked over 500+ miles with.

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.
Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.

2)   Your Trail Family Is Going to Change

Whether you start with a partner or not, it’s likely who you hike with will ultimately change. It was really hard to say goodbye to people I’d spent 100+ miles with, but I quickly realized that with goodbyes come hellos. Sometimes people you are hiking with might prefer to speed up or slow down and you’ll need to naturally separate. When I look back on the trail, if I would have stuck with my first trail family, I would have made far fewer friends in the long run. I’m glad I moved around and hiked with different groups.

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.

3)   Hiking & Camping Alone Isn’t Scary

My parents insisted that I camp alone before setting out on the Pacific Crest Trail, so I’d camped alone for two nights prior to starting my thru-hike. Even with that, I was STILL scared at the beginning of my PCT hike when I camped alone. However, by the end of the trail, some of my favorite nights were when I was on my own schedule and alone in my own campsite. I now love hiking & backpacking solo. Don’t be afraid to spend some days & nights alone with yourself. For peace of mind and safety precautions, we do recommend hiking with an off-grid communication tool, like the Garmin InReach.

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.

4)   Act Like You’re Backpacking Europe for 5 Months

Some of the towns you travel through you’ll most likely never visit again. If you like the town, take a rest day & hang out to explore. If there is a restaurant in town or brewery you’re dying to check out do it.

Here are a few suggestions on things not to miss while hiking the Pacific Crest Trail:

California

  • Summit Mt. Whitney
  • Take the JMT detour — don’t miss having lunch at Lake Aloha
  • Chill in Tahoe for a zero-day

Oregon

  • Fall in love with the cool cities: Ashland, Bend
  • Don’t miss eating at Morning Glory’s Restaurant in Ashland & by all means get breakfast & lunch
  • Don’t skip the Crater Lake detour

Washington

  • Leavenworth is worth checking out if you have time
  • Stehekin Bakery is a do not miss

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.

5)   You can be TOO hydrated

Never heard of electrolyte imbalance? I hadn’t either. I’m not a big water drinker, so I knew on the trail I’d need to make sure to hydrate. What I ended up doing though was overhydrating, and I wound up really sick in Julian, CA. It was an incredibly hot day and I basically flooded my system with water & washed out my electrolytes.

The warning signs of electrolyte imbalance are:

  • Slurring of speech & inability to produce coherent thoughts
  • Muscle spasms, aches, or twitchiness
  • Headaches & fatigue
  • Dizziness when standing up & disorientation

You can avoid this mistake by using Salt Sticks, Nunn Hydration tablets, or carrying salty items to snack on when the weather is hot & you’re needing to hydrate more than usual.

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.I found this packet with information on electrolyte imbalance AFTER my incident. Be prepared.

6)   It’s Okay to Call Home & Cry

When I hit Kennedy Meadows North, I called home from a remote location on a payphone using lots of quarters to let my parents know I was quitting and getting off the trail. My not-so-outdoorsy mother told me, “Oh hunny, you just need another shower. You’re just tired. Go get some rest & see how you feel tomorrow.” The truth was, as I stood there clinging to the phone, I knew my mom was right.

I’d taken one shower, and I could count 10 places I still saw dirt on my legs. I did need another shower. And I was exhausted, my back hurt from my bear canister digging into it. We’d also had a really scary descent into town with more snow than I thought we’d encounter AND… the store was out of ice cream bars. The trail will make you emotional wreck at times. That’s okay. In my opinion, if you feel like you want to quit—give it a week and keep walking North. For me, I woke up the next morning, hitched back to the trail, and kept walking North.

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.This photo was taken on the same day that I called my mom crying.

7)   Be Honest

If you share your hike on social media, you’re going to have a lot of people following you & supporting you. It might feel uncomfortable to show the not so glamorous side of thru-hiking, but I highly recommend you do, because you’re going to need that community’s support with the tough stuff.

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.

Also, be honest when you’re scared on the trail and ask others to support you with your fears. I was hiking alone in the Southern California desert when I passed a section of trail in which there were three massive rattlesnakes lining both sides of the trail. I did a 180 and stopped for a 2nd breakfast until there were other hikers to pass the section alongside. I told them why I had stopped and it was empowering when they asked if I wanted to hike with them through it. Goat Rocks Wilderness & numerous snowy passes in the Sierras, I was scared as well, but after vocalizing my fears to friends I felt supported by those I was hiking with.

8)   People Die Every Year In Wilderness Settings…and on the PCT

I don’t say this to be morbid, I say this because it’s not just a walk in the woods. If you’re serious about hiking the PCT, take the time to prepare physically, mentally, and in any skillsets, you think you’ll need. I read a lot of information about hypothermia, river crossings, snake bites, falls, etc. Goat Rocks Wilderness & the Sierras were the two biggest sections that I was scared.

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.The Sierras were scary for me as I wasn’t experienced with hiking through snow. I took time to ask questions & learn as much as I could to feel confident & comfortable.

9)   Hiker Boxes Shouldn’t Be Skipped

Some of the gear items I found in hiker boxes I still have to this day –  including a compression sack for my sleeping bag. Some hiker boxes will also help introduce some variety into your resupply boxes if you’re unhappy with anything you packed. Plus…hiker box finds are FREE & it’s an easy place to find more fuel without having to find an outdoors store.

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.

That full-size Siracha was a game-changer for meals & someone had ditched it in a hiker box because of the weight. “One hiker’s hiker box ditch is another’s hiker’s greatest trail joy” is the way the saying goes.

10)   Don’t give yourself a schedule

If you’re tired, stop & take a nap. If you’re hungry, pull over & make something yummy. The trail will be over before you know it & you’ll miss it more than you can imagine once you reach the Canadian border. Take time to embrace what it means to slow down and appreciate the opportunity you have to be on your own timeline & schedule through such a beautiful landscape.

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.Afternoon siestas were hard for me to embrace. I’m a go-go-go type of person but my trail family really helped me come to kick back, forget the schedule, and relax. Honestly, your body will thank you.

11) You got this.

As hard as it will be, it’s 100% worth it. The Pacific Crest Trail is notorious for having the lowest completion rate of any long distance trail, and you’ll see why when you’re on it. If you’re planning to hike the PCT, it takes commitment. Don’t give up on yourself too quickly when the going gets tough. Take training for your thru-hike seriously. You’ve most likely put your life on hold to hike the trail plus not to mention the financial investment in gear for the Pacific Crest Trail & your Pacific Crest Trail resupply boxes. Don’t quit just because you have a rough few miles.

Take a zero-day in town, shower, sleep in a comfy bed with fluffy pillows, and treat yourself to some non-trail food…then get back out there. My experience was always realizing how much I missed the trail within the first mile after a zero-day.

Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.
Thinking about thru hiking the PCT? Get 11 tips from a solo female hiker who successfully completed all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail.
Have you completed a long distance hiking trail? What lessons did you learn?
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About the author

Kim is a former principal who quit her job to solo hike all 2,650 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail. In other words…she’s a badass. She currently lives in Santa Barbara where she is practicing yoga, whipping up some tasty vegetarian food, and working as a guide leading kayaking, hiking, and biking. At Bearfoot Theory, she runs our editorial calendar, and helps us deliver top-notch goods. Follow Kim on Instagram.

1 Comment on “11 Tips for Hiking the PCT from a Solo-Female Thru-Hiker

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  1. This was SO inspiring! I am looking to hike the PCT myself and this really helped give me a raw account of (kinda) what the reality of it is. I hope to make it out there in the next few years and I look forward to using your guides to help plan! (:

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